Chai Tea -- A delicious, herb packed cure to digestives issues.

Everyone from India rolls their eyes when an American say chai tea. The word chai is Hindi for tea. Saying “chai tea” is saying “tea tea.” Not exactly a sophisticated linguistic move. Commenting on this at the beginning of chai recipe is cliche. Every blogger who writes about chai must do it. It’s obligatory. I tried not too, but the urge was too strong. The more accurate term is masala chai meaning spice tea. Chai can be spiced any number of ways but the most common spices are those used in ginger bread — ginger, pepper, cardamom, cinnamon, fennel, and cloves.

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Tracking Your Blood Sugar... Not Just for Diabetics?

A study of 1700 participants in 2008 found that the simple act of tracking meals in a food diary led to twice the weight loss than those that simply followed a low sodium diet and got in the minimum requirements for exercise. Twice the weight loss, not by carb counting, not calorie counting, not weighing their portion sizes; simply writing down what was consumed. Participants also turned in these lists in support groups on a weekly basis. Now we have not only monitoring but also the accountability of knowing someone else was going to see them. This is huge when it comes to making meaningful, long lasting changes. If you know someone is going to see what you are eating you are going to make better choices and if you know that you are going to have to write down each little thing you eat you are probably going to eat fewer things and in more balanced proportions.

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Breaking Your Social Media Addiction with the Freedom App

We are addicted to social media. Yes, as a society as a whole. But my wife and I have a confession to make—we use social media more than we would like. Sometimes we want to stop, but can’t quite find the motivation to stop. Other times, we check social media reflexively, without thought or intention. Does this sound familiar to you? I imagine it does. I see it occurring almost everywhere I go. Whole families looking down at their phones at restaurants; people using their phones in the middle of concerts, while watching TV and while ordering coffee. Yes, I am guilty of judging others for their imprudent use of cell phones, but it’s hypocritical judgement. Most of us are guilty. We don’t know how to take a break.

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Critical Concepts for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease: Supplements, Blood pressure Control and Medication

I get excited when I write about lifestyle prevention. It’s a call to be pro-active, to engage in healthy living, to give our bodies the building blocks they need to function optimally. People make these changes and their whole lives can improve — their mood, their body image, their energy. They feel better, and they’re preventing disease. But sometimes lifestyle alone is not enough to adequately prevent heart disease. This occurs when risk of cardiovascular disease is high enough that we need to maximize prevention from every angle possible or when it’s just not feasible to make life-style changes. In these cases, supplements and pharmaceuticals can lend a hand in helping prevent cardiovascular disease.

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Critical Concepts for Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Diet, Exercise and Smoking

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in American, it accounts for 1/4 of the deaths in our country. If you are an American, then you are almost automatically at significant risk of cardiovascular disease. The typical westernized diet and lifestyle almost seems it was intentionally designed to cause cardiovascular disease. Luckily, we know how to prevent cardiovascular disease and we likely could prevent 40%-50% of cardiovascular disease with lifestyle alone. Since we are all at risk, a cardiovascular disease prevention lifestyle should be started as early as possible.

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Andrew Day, NDComment
Minestrone - An easy way to supercharge your diet with vegetables.

The stories I could tell about the weeks when our family decides that we need to reset our focus on eating well. These are the weeks when our lives have become out of control busy and lazy eating habits rear their ugly head. This is going to happen from time to time. We try to prevent it, but it is almost inevitable. When this does happen, the important thing is that you recognize that it is occurring and you create a plan for getting things back on track.

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Andrew Day, NDComment
How to treat diabetes successfully

Type II Diabetes is an increasingly common disease in America. Just under 10% of American have diabetes. The rate in Washington state and Kitsap county is 9%. Diabetes is a disease of blood glucose dysregulation. As blood sugar levels rise after a meal, a hormone call insulin rises. Insulin tells fat cells and liver cells to let in more sugar. But in diabetes, fat cells and liver cells stop responding as well to insulin. This leads to higher levels of blood sugars. In turn, higher levels of blood sugar lead to increased risk of heart disease, renal disease, retinal disease (eye disease), and neuropathies (numbness, tingling, pain and loss of sensation, typically in the feet and lower legs). Increasingly, diabetes is seen as increasing risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

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Andrew Day, NDComment
Contrast Hydrotherapy - A traditional naturopathic tool

One of the interventions that I commonly recommend is contrast hydrotherapy.  Contrast hydrotherapy is quite simple. It’s applications of hot water followed by applications of cold water. Typically I recommend 3 minutes of hot followed by thirty seconds of cold and have that cycle repeated three times ending on cold. This simple intervention can have quite profound effects on pain and can also help people feel more wake, alert, and vital.

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Andrew Day, ND Comment